It’s Only The Beginning – The Memoirs Of Lakota Warrior Theȟíya Kté From Wounded Knee


Growing up in a traditional Lakota family on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota (USA) in the 1950s, Garry tells about becoming a warrior at the age of twelve, followed by his involvement in history-making events such as the seventy-one-day takeover of Wounded Knee in 1973 and the Mní Wičóni movement to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline in 2016/17. This book is a result of a longterm co-working between the author and Corina. Delia J. Welch and Juanita Schmalnauer also helped a lot and contributed pictures. Eventually, Ronny brought everything together in a beautiful design and got the book ready for print and release. // It’s Only The Beginning is a memoir written in English while using words and terms of the Lakota language. It also includes various pictures and is printed on high-quality natural paper. // Available worldwide in bookstores and online shops such as Amazon.comHugendubel.deAmazon.de, and bod.de. ++++ Update: Sadly, Garry Rowland passed on to the spirit world on September 3, 2018. One of his visions was the reinstallment of his museum, the Holocaust Museum At Wounded Knee, which is a museum for the fading culture of the Lakota people. So all proceeds from the book sales go to his children and may help to make his dream come true. 

»It’s really interesting and greatly written, and it would be important if many Americans read this. I’m really excited about it now. It is completely written from his point of view, totally ethnologically super interesting, and closing sentences at the end of a chapter are so on point. The fact that some photos look so old or are not that good makes it just as authentic. Who knows which effects this book will have… For the grandchildren and great-grandchildren, it will definitely be a treasure.« Anja Rackowiak, Ethnologist
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»To me, Rowland’s book “It’s Only The Beginning” was a great read, because I liked the perspective from an Indian about the struggle of the Natives in the US, even in the second half of the 20th century and nowadays. While reading the book, you learn a lot about the Lakota culture and ceremonies through a life of an Indian warrior. Several words have been translated into the Lakotah language, which creates a fitting atmosphere for the book. Therefore I would absolutely recommend it to other students, interested in the history of the Lakota people, because the book does inform well from a personal point of view about things we usually don’t hear that often.« L. S., Student